Trip to London

Today was the day of the London trip. Due to issues with coach bookings we had to go to the London trip a week after we were suppose to. We left the university at 8.30 and got back at 7.00. We went to the Victora and Albert Museum to see the Post Modernism exhibition. We also planned to visit the science museum to look at a piece called ‘listening post’. Today I went to the exhibition. We ran out of time before going to the science museum so I didn’t get to go. I enjoyed the day very much and i learnt lots of information about different artists.

Here at some of the pieces of work which were my favourite I saw at the Post Modernism exhibition.

Paula Scher

Trust Elvis poster for Elvis Costello 1981

In this poster for British rocker Elvis Costello, Scher’s use of bold colour and type recalls political advertisements. The poster makes a brief appearance in Bret Easton Ellis’s 1985 novel Less Than Zero. ‘I look up with caution at the poster encased in glass that hangs on the wall above my bed… Elvis looks past me, with this wry, ironic smile on his lips, staring out the window.’

Frank Schreiner

Consumer’s Rest Chair 1990

This chair, by German avant-garde design collective Stiletto, invites you to sit down, relax and roll down an imaginary supermarket aisle. Though early versions were made from salvaged objects, the chair was eventually manufactured at a shopping trolley factory: an example of postmodern design being sustained by the very structure it critiqued.

The next piece of art are videos. (sorry about the shaky camera)

Godfrey Reggio

Film extracts: Koyaanisqatsi 1982

Director GodfreyReggio’s Koyaanisqatsi (a Hopi word meaning ‘world out of joint’) has been called a ‘postmodern denunciation of the culture of postmodernism’. The film’s stop-motion footage of city traffic, coursing like water through the street past mirrored office buildings, is accompanied by a frenetic musical score by Phillip Glass. The film presents the city as dehumanised and alienation, but captivating all the same.

Samuel Kane Kwei

Mercedes Coffin 1993

Samuel Kane Kwei is a coffin-maker from Ghana who brings fantastic imagery, including that of new foreign goods, into local funeral customs. From a Euro-American perspective, his handmade coffins seem to echo that key postmodern preoccupation, constructing the self through commodities.

Overall i had a good time and i found it really interesting to visit the Victora and Albert Museum.

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